• Compromise Defense Policy Bill Would Boost Force Levels

    Compromise Defense Policy Bill Would Boost Force Levels0

    The House and Senate Armed Services committees have settled on a compromise fiscal 2017 defense authorization bill that would halt planned cuts in the end strength of the Army, Air Force and Marines in the coming year, while jettisoning several provisions that were likely to draw a presidential veto. The conference report likely will be filed today. The House is expected to vote on the agreement Friday, and the Senate is expected to take it up next week, reported Military Times. Perhaps the most far-reaching impact of the legislation for defense communities is its rejection of the Pentagon’s plans to reduce the size of the Army and Marine Corps …

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  • Outsourcing, Mission Changes to Shape Installation of the Future

    Outsourcing, Mission Changes to Shape Installation of the Future1

    The Army’s real property footprint can be expected to evolve incrementally as past decisions about the role of the service’s installations continue to exert a critical influence on its infrastructure, according to an appendix in the Army’s new strategic framework for supporting its installation requirements. But several changes already are shaping the installation of the future, starting with a trend toward greater outsourcing for both installation and mission support activities. The extent to which an installation can rely on the surrounding community for support services — including housing, childcare, recreation and retail — will depend on local conditions …

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  • There’s More than One Way to Forge a Partnership, Hammack Says

    There’s More than One Way to Forge a Partnership, Hammack Says0

    The new authority enacted in the fiscal 2013 defense authorization bill allowing military installations and their host communities to enter into intergovernmental support agreements (IGSAs) for base support services has brought renewed attention to the importance of installation-community partnerships. In an interview about the IGSA signed last month by the city Monterey, Calif., and the

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  • Monterey, Army Enter New Chapter in Municipal Partnership

    Monterey, Army Enter New Chapter in Municipal Partnership2

    When the existing contract between the city of Monterey, Calif., and the Presidio of Monterey that governs the city’s delivery of base operation services to the Army runs out at the end of the year, very little will change on the surface. The city will continue to supply the Presidio a range of support services — including engineering services and maintenance functions for facilities, streets, storm drains, grounds, and fire alarm and detection systems — on a cost-reimbursement basis. But Jan. 1 will mark the transition from a contract based on the Federal Acquisition Regulation to an arrangement that takes advantage of the authority enacted in the fiscal 2013 defense authorization bill allowing military installations and their host communities to enter into intergovernmental support agreements (IGSAs) for base support services …

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  • New Director Looking to Take Air Force’s Partnership Program to the Next Level

    New Director Looking to Take Air Force’s Partnership Program to the Next Level0

    After reaching a major achievement last month, the Air Force Community Partnership program is expected to continue growing with a new focus on initiatives with higher returns on investment, says the program’s new director. While the partnership program is “doing phenomenally well,” the service has started to concentrate on initiatives that can be implemented across a variety of installations and that can generate a higher payoff for the Air Force as well as the community, Teran Judd, director of community partnership and encroachment, told On Base …

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  • More Marines Would Be Optimal, Review Finds

    More Marines Would Be Optimal, Review Finds0

    A new force structure assessment has concluded that the Marine Corps ideally could grow by 8,000 troops, but the service still plans on operating with an end strength of 182,000 Marines. “The path we’re on is to go to 182,000 Marines,” Lt. Gen. Robert Walsh, commander of Marine Corps Combat Development Command, told Military.com. “That’s what we’re going to be funded for; that’s what we’re allowed to do by Congress. But in a perfect world … we came up with about 190,000; that is the optimized force,” Walsh said. The increase would help the service keep up with a high pace of operations, and the need to expand its cyber and technological capabilities …

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