Programs & Services

Journal of Defense Communities

TheĀ Journal of Defense Communities, is an online, peer-reviewed publication featuring original research, analysis, and the best practices of ADC members and our military partners.


Volume II (2013)

When Jane and Johnny Come Marching Home: How Local Communities Can Help Veterans and Military Families

This article will examine one central question ā€” how can local governments determine their role in supporting veterans and their families? With thousands of veterans set to return home from Iraq and Afghanistan, coupled with planned reductions in overall end strength of the armed forces, it is absolutely critical that local governments understand the military family and veterans issues in their communities and prepare to play an active role in addressing them.

Volume I (2012)

How Congress Cleared the Bases: A Legislative History of BRAC

The Journal’s debut article provides a detailed account of how the federal government came up with the idea of relying on an independent commission to close military installations and how Congress settled on the BRAC process used most recently in 2005. The article is an excellent first step for communities and others trying to gain a sense of Congress’ most likely moves in the immediate future as DoD tries to start a new BRAC round.

Installation-Community Partnerships: A New Paradigm for Collaborating in the 21st Century

The article explores the changes that are prompting military and community leaders to take a closer look at partnerships, and provides a template for assessing the success of a prospective collaboration. The paper includes two case studies — the arrangement under which the city of Monterey, Calif., provides all facility maintenance at the Presidio of Monterey; and the enhanced use lease at Nellis Air Force Base that resulted in the city of North Las Vegas building a $25 million fitness center for the Air Force.


About the Journal
The Journal is designed to provide in-depth perspectives and analysis on the methods, best practices and challenges involved in a particular project or initiative. The subject matter of the Journal, however, is not limited to educating members about past achievements. It also will offer the opportunity for contributors to consider the implications of a new policy or technology, provide commentary on a timely issue, or promote a new approach or solution to a defense community concern.

The publication covers the breadth of defense community disciplines ā€” base realignment and closure, community-military partnering, military privatization initiatives, enhanced use leasing, mission growth and sustainment, regional/community planning, energy security, military families and veterans support, base redevelopment, environmental cleanup and property disposal.

Journal articles will be posted online throughout the year as they are completed, and will exist as part of an annual issue. New articles will be announced in our newsletter, Defense Communities 360.


Article Submissions

The success of the Journal depends on our members and military partners. Articles in the Journal can be submitted by members, either public or private sector, along with civilian and uniformed personnel in the installations community who have played a role in helping successful projects come together.

If you have a project, initiative or issue that you would like to see published in the Journal, the first step is to send an abstract of your idea for an article to Dan Cohen at dcohen@defensecommunities.org. Your proposal then will be reviewed by ADC’s Publications Advisory Committee. If the committee approves the topic, you can begin drafting the article.

View the Journal’s editorial guidelines.

Journal of Defense Communities

ADC’s newest publication, the Journal of Defense Communities, is an online, peer-reviewed publication featuring original research, analysis, and the best practices of ADC members and our military partners.

About the Journal

The Journal is designed to provide in-depth perspectives and analysis on the methods, best practices and challenges involved in a particular project or initiative. The subject matter of the Journal, however, is not limited to educating members about past achievements. It also will offer the opportunity for contributors to consider the implications of a new policy or technology, provide commentary on a timely issue, or promote a new approach or solution to a defense community concern.

The publication covers the breadth of defense community disciplines ā€” base realignment and closure, community-military partnering, military privatization initiatives, enhanced use leasing, mission growth and sustainment, regional/community planning, energy security, military families and veterans support, base redevelopment, environmental cleanup and property disposal.

Journal articles will be posted online throughout the year as they are completed, and will exist as part of an annual issue. New articles will be announced in our newsletter, Defense Communities 360.

Article Submissions

The success of the Journal depends on our members and military partners. Articles in the Journal can be submitted by members, either public or private sector, along with civilian and uniformed personnel in the installations community who have played a role in helping successful projects come together.

If you have a project, initiative or issue that you would like to see published in the Journal, the first step is to send an abstract of your idea for an article to Dan Cohen at dcohen@defensecommunities.org. Your proposal then will be reviewed by ADC’s Publications Advisory Committee. If the committee approves the topic, you can begin drafting the article.

View the Journal’s editorial guidelines.

Volume I (2012)

How Congress Cleared the Bases: A Legislative History of BRAC, George Schlossberg

The Journal’s debut article provides a detailed account of how the federal government came up with the idea of relying on an independent commission to close military installations and how Congress settled on the BRAC process used most recently in 2005. The article is an excellent first step for communities and others trying to gain a sense of Congress’ most likely moves in the immediate future as DoD tries to start a new BRAC round.

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