Community Partnership at Travis AFB Yields Emergency Responder Training Site

Community Partnership at Travis AFB Yields Emergency Responder Training Site

Officials at Travis Air Force Base in northern California this month will open up a new multipurpose training site that will enable emergency responders from the installation, as well as local and federal law enforcement agencies, to train together and integrate operations.

The site — developed under the Air Force Community Partnership program — will offer training opportunities for security and law enforcement, fire, medical and emergency ordnance disposal personnel.

“This compound will provide a site for first responders and emergency responders to utilize to collectively train together,” Maj. Jearl Allman, commander of the 60th Security Forces Squadron, told Travis Public Affairs. “No longer will medical be training separately from fire, who is training separately from security; we will all be training together to make sure we can do business together.”

The Air Force paid for the modular units and site preparation of the compound; maintenance and repairs will be paid for by the local community, which is estimated to save at least $10,000 a year for the base.

Public agencies taking advantage of the compound will benefit as well. “It may take about a year to figure out the numbers, but local responders will no longer need to travel long distances at other sites, they can now train locally,” Allman said.

But the benefits of partnership will go much further than saving money, as the site will allow airmen and other security forces members to integrate training and operations with local and federal law enforcement agencies, according to the story.

“We will be able to practice with the local community as well, such as joint-active shooter responses,” Allman said. “We’ll be able to train together to accurately respond to any threat, we’ll be able to communicate and work together at all times.”

The training site will accommodate a variety of scenarios, including hostage situations, casualty response, and drug and bomb detection.

“Security Forces will obviously get a lot of use out of it, but it will be used by many agencies,” said Capt. Matthew McGinnis, operations officer for the 60th Security Forces Squadron. “The 349th Air Mobility Wing and the 621st Contingency Response Group have expressed interest in the site as well as 16 local and federal agencies; it will really be a community site,” McGinnis said.

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