‘Smart City’ Technologies Could Pave Way to Army’s ‘Installation of the Future’

‘Smart City’ Technologies Could Pave Way to Army’s ‘Installation of the Future’

In its quest to shape the “installation of the future,” the Army over the next 12 to 18 months plans to launch several pilot programs to test “smart city” technologies. Much of the Army’s effort to design the installation of the future will focus on new ways to deliver services, or to stop providing them altogether, reports Federal News Radio. The first step will be to solicit input from soldiers about what services are important to them and how they want them delivered, said Lt. Gen. Gwen Bingham, the Army’s assistant chief of staff for installation management.

“Today’s soldiers want to be able to have service at their phone tips, so to speak, an app for everything,” Bingham said at a conference hosted by the service’s Training and Doctrine Command. Many services could be provided by the private sector or nonprofits, such as child care and housing referral, she said.

Beyond reinventing service delivery, a shift to smart city technology would require the Army to adopt practices local governments have turned to, including using sensors to collect information from existing systems and employing artificial intelligence to aid decision making. That approach, for example, can improve traffic and energy management. Applications for installations could include securing the perimeter and detecting drone overflight, said Richard Kidd, the Army’s deputy assistant secretary for strategic integration.

Officials tentatively are planning to hold an industry day in November.

Army photo by Sgt. Christopher Gaylord

Dan Cohen
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