State-of-the-Art Treatment System Cleans Groundwater at Former Pease AFB

State-of-the-Art Treatment System Cleans Groundwater at Former Pease AFB

The collaborative effort to clean up groundwater contaminated with PFAS chemicals at the former Pease AFB, N.H., will allow the site “to serve as a model for the rest of the country,” New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D) said last week following a tour of a new $9.3 million pump-and-treat system at the base’s former firefighting training area. “We’ve got some history that has allowed us to hopefully get ahead and deal with the problem early,” Shaheen said, reported Seacoastonline.com.

The treatment plant, which began operations in April, is one element of the estimated $35 million to $40 million the Air Force has spent to address extremely high levels of PFAS at what is now home to the Pease International Tradeport. The state-of-the-art system uses granulated activated carbon as well as resins to remove the contaminants from water. While the plant is reducing the presence of PFAS from water coming into it to “non-detect” levels,  it is expected to take at least five to 10 years before the concentration of PFAS in the groundwater at the site begins to drop, said Stephen TerMaath, chief of the Air Force Civil Engineer Center’s BRAC Program Management Division.

 

Air Force photo by Alex Grotewohl

Dan Cohen
Dan Cohen
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