Army Stakeholders Learn about New Guidance for Energy Efficiency, Resiliency Investments

Army Stakeholders Learn about New Guidance for Energy Efficiency, Resiliency Investments

With the objective of DOD’s former Energy Conservation Investment Program recently extended to include projects designed to enhance energy resilience, officials from across the Army responsible for the rechristened Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment Program (ERCIP) met last month to learn about the service’s new planning guidance for prospective projects. The importance of updating the Army’s process for reviewing candidates was heightened due to the service’s directive requiring installations to ensure critical mission capabilities are protected from disruption, said Dominic Ragucci, the Army’s ERCIP program manager. The directive calls for installations to develop the capability to sustain their energy and water requirements for at least 14 days during a service interruption.

The directive requires backup power systems which may not save an installation money in the same way a conventional energy efficiency or renewable project would, leading to a revision in the lifecycle cost analysis for projects, Ragucci said. Achieving energy resiliency and security means installations essentially are backing up backup systems, he explained, and trying to satisfy a minimum savings-to-investment ratio can be challenging, reported the Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville.

 

Photo by Stephen Baack

Dan Cohen
Dan Cohen
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