• New Climate Policies Needn’t Disrupt DOD’s Reliance on Renewables, Conger Says

    New Climate Policies Needn’t Disrupt DOD’s Reliance on Renewables, Conger Says0

    President Trump’s steps so far to back away from existing policies intended to address climate change have not upended the military services’ push to increasingly rely on renewable energy sources to power their installations. But the department’s former installations and energy chief says even if the new administration revisits DOD’s policies on sustainability, it should be careful not to limit efforts that can be justified for reasons beyond their environmental benefits. There is a clear business case for the military to develop new generation capacity on base using solar, wind or other renewable resources as they are generally financed by developers or utilities and can cut an installation’s electricity bill, John Conger, who led the Pentagon’s installations office from 2012 to 2015, told Defense Communities 360 …

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  • Rising Seas Will Overtake Land at Coastal Installations, Study Concludes

    Rising Seas Will Overtake Land at Coastal Installations, Study Concludes0

    Military installations on the East and Gulf coasts are extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with rising sea levels expected to threaten increasing amounts of coastal land over the coming decades, according to an analysis by the Union of Concerned Scientists released Wednesday. Coastal installations will experience more extensive tidal flooding and when hurricanes strike, deeper and more extensive storm surge flooding, the study concluded. “We’re now at the front end of the changes that will occur, with some installations already dealing with flooding during extreme high tides,” said Erika Spanger-Siegfried, lead author of the report …

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  • Climate Change Poses Threat to Army’s Readiness Goals

    Climate Change Poses Threat to Army’s Readiness Goals0

    Following several years of stringent budget caps that reduced funding for training, the Army has identified readiness as its No. 1 priority. But now the service’s efforts to build readiness “across the full spectrum of operations” through large-scale training at its combat training centers could be limited by another constraint — climate change. The effects of climate change, including the increased frequency of extreme weather events — such as flooding, wildfires and droughts — and longer periods of hot temperature, already are interfering with the Army’s ability to train for its combat mission, Richard Kidd, deputy assistant secretary for energy and sustainability, said during a panel discussion held last month at the Pentagon to celebrate Earth Day. “Without access to ranges and land, the Army’s readiness suffers …

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