• Navy Projects Slight Uptick in End Strength by 20200

    The number of Navy personnel will increase by 3,000 sailors over the next five years to 328,000, according to the service’s current plans. The service now is planning the composition of the fleet of sailors it projects it will need in 2025, reports Military.com. “We kind of have a sense of what the fleet looks like, now we can have conversations about what the sailors of 2025 will look like. It is a matter of attracting and keeping the sailors to man that fleet,” said Cmdr. Chris Servello, spokesman for the chief of Navy Personnel …

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  • Air Force Not Planning Involuntary Force Reductions in FY’15, James Says0

    The Air Force will not go ahead with involuntary force reductions planned for fiscal 2015, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said Tuesday during an online forum. “[Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh and I] are in agreement that enough is enough,” James said as she neared her first anniversary at her post. “We have reduced far enough. We will not go lower, and we will fight to hold on to the numbers now that we have.” In 2014, the Air Force selected more than 13,000 airmen for voluntary separation and more than 6,000 to leave involuntarily …

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  • Many Military Families Seek Food Aid, Survey Finds0

    An estimated 25 percent of households with a member currently serving in the military receive food assistance from the Feeding America network, the nation’s largest provider of charitable food assistance to low-income Americans, according to a recent survey conducted by the nonprofit. The survey estimated that 620,000 households that seek food assistance from a Feeding America network agency include at least one member serving in the military. Jennifer Gilmore, executive director of the Feeding America San Diego food bank, said she was shocked recently to see 300 people lined up at a military housing development to collect bags of produce …

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  • Staffing Level of Navy to Remain Steady, Personnel Chief Says0

    Despite the looming prospect of far-reaching changes to the armed forces, including reductions in force structure and adjustments to military compensation, the Navy will not be reducing its number of uniformed personnel, Vice Adm. Bill Moran, deputy chief of naval operations, said Wednesday. “I’m not anticipating having to cut people at all … The future is really bright for folks who want to continue to serve,” Moran, who also serves as chief of naval personnel, said in response to the first question during a worldwide all-hands call. He said the Navy expects to have a force of about 324,000 sailors in five years, the same as it does today …

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  • Reducing Army End Strength to 420,000 an Option, Senior Official Says0

    The pressure of long-term budget constraints is forcing Army officials to consider difficult tradeoffs as they try to balance force structure, readiness and modernization, with a decision to shrink the service’s active-duty force to 420,000 one distinct possibility. “We’re on a glide path, and the monies are laid out to give us a 420,000 Army by 2019,” Lt. Gen. James Barclay III, the Army’s deputy chief of staff, G-8, told attendees at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Aviation Symposium & Exposition last week. “That doesn’t mean we’re set on going to 420, we’ve got some decision points built in, coming into the ’16, ’17 timeframe, so we’re taking a hard look at what is the right set …

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  • Soldiers Expected to Benefit from Loosening of Ft. Drum’s Housing Market0

    The North Country region of New York surrounding Fort Drum, typically a very tight housing market, now has a 5 percent vacancy rate, a development that will make it easier for soldiers stationed there to find accommodations in the Watertown area. As a result, military personnel should have more options in the community, and landlords will be forced to compete with newer properties, said James Wright, executive director of the Development Authority of the North Country. “That dynamic has now changed, and it will change the interaction within the community …

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